Mid-late twentieth and twenty-first century Australian

This sub-collection makes up a large proportion of the collection and includes work by renowned artists such as Lloyd Rees, Arthur Boyd, Noel Counihan, David Rankin, Sidney Nolan, Rick Amor, John Olsen, Charles Blackman, Mandy Martin, Clifton Pugh and George Gittoes.

 

Lloyd Rees_1945 summer morn near kiama

Image: Lloyd Rees, Summer Morn Near Kiama, 1945. Oil on canvas © Alan and Jancis Rees, used with permission.

  

The Collection has sizable quantities of prints by famed Australian artist Arthur Boyd. Boyd is best known as a painter who was a key figure of The Angry Penguins ­– an Australian modernist artistic and literary movement that sought to define a new, rebellious style of painting in Australia – alongside Sidney Nolan, Joy Hester, Albert Tucker, Danila Vassilieff and others. BHRAG holds many of Boyd’s lithographs and aquatints produced during the 1970s which explored his interest in mythological and biblical subjects outside of his primary focus on landscape painting.

 

David Rankin_1984 Ouyen Study IIImage: David Rankin, Ouyen study II, 1984. Oil on canvas © David Rankin, used with permission.  

  

This sub-collection also includes more than forty paintings and prints by David Rankin. After immigrating to Australia from England, Rankin lived throughout rural New South Wales and Victoria – including the Far West town of Bourke – before settling in Sydney in 1967. Rankin’s abstract and expressive paintings are inspired by diverse landscapes and ecosystems in outback Australia and throughout the world, most eagerly demonstrated in his Ouyen study series.

 

John Olsen_1984 clarendon springs

Image: John Olsen, Clarendon, Spring. Make Sure the Sun Wipes its Feet, 1984. Oil on hardboard © John Olsen, used with permission. 

 

Other significant works within this collection include Clarendon, Spring. Make Sure the Sun Wipes its Feet (1984) by John Olsen; Summer Morn Near Kiama (1945) by Lloyd Rees; and Little Boy Lost (1983) by Sir Sidney Nolan.